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Morning

07:00 a.m. - 08:00 a.m.
Mentor Breakfast

Location: Capitol Ballroom E

08:00 a.m. - 09:00 a.m.
State of the Art 2 - Evolution of Desire

Location: Capitol Ballroom A-D
Moderator: Cindy Meston, PhD

08:00 a.m. - 09:00 a.m.
Evolution of Desire

David M. Buss, PhD


09:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Stump the Professor

Location: Capitol Ballroom A-D
Faculty: Andrew T. Goldstein, MD, IF, FACOG, Irwin Goldstein, MD, IF, Susan Kellogg-Spadt, PhD, CRNP, IF & Sharon J. Parish, MD, IF, NCMP

10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Coffee Break - Visit Exhibitors

Location: Capitol View Terrace

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Research Podium Session 2 - Clinical Trials & Surgery

Location: Capitol Ballroom A-D
Moderators: Melissa Farmer & Timothy C. Hlavinka, MD, IF

10:30 a.m. - 10:40 a.m.
Body Image and Sexual Considerations of Women Following Genital Plastic/Cosmetic Procedures: The Vulvovagional Aesthetic Surgery Evaluation (“VASE-2”) Study 2-Year Results (#009)

M. Goodman

009
Body Image and Sexual Considerations of Women Following Genital Plastic/Cosmetic Procedures: The Vulvovagional Aesthetic Surgery Evaluation ("VASE-2") Study 2-Year Results
Goodman, M1; Placik, O2; Dalton, T3; Matlock, D4; Simopoulos, A4; Hardwick-Smith, S5
1: Caring For Women Wellness Center, Davis, CA, USA; 2: Associated Plastic Surgeons, S.C., Chicago, IL, USA; 3: University of California, Irvine CA, USA; 4: Laser Vaginal Rejuvenation Institute of America, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 5: Complete Women's Care Center; Houston, TX, USA

Objective: There is robust evidence-based data that a woman's perceptions and comfort regarding her genitals directly affects the quality of her sexual function. Concern exists that surgically-produced change in genital appearance and/or function may be detrimental in certain situations, e.g. in women with body dysmorphia or sexual dysfunction. This study evaluates whether genital plastic/cosmetic surgery (FGPS) improves genital self-image and sexual function and the predictive ability of validated instruments to determine body dysmorphia in women undergoing FGPS
Materials and Methods: Prospective convenience cohort study. Data transmitted directly from participants to blinded research assistant. Outcome measures are degree of body dysmorphia, genital self-image, sexual satisfaction and body esteem in women undergoing FGPS vs. controls at entry, 6, 12, and 24 months. Instruments used were the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, modified for Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD-YBOCS), Female Genital Self-Image Scale (FGSIS), Index of Sexual Satisfaction (ISS), and Body Esteem Scale (BES)
Results: In an entry group of 120 FGPS patients compared to 50 controls. Pre-occupation, Behavior, Avoidance and Total scores on the BDD-YBOCS were in the dysmorphic range (7.62, 6.51, 1.78, and 15.9 respectively, compared to control values of 1.90, 2.50, 0.32, and 6.66). At 1 year (67.1% response) these values fell to 2.01, 2.61, 029 and 4.91 respectively (p<.001), and at 2 years (47.1% response) total score remained similar to controls (P<.001). (Figure) FGSIS and ISS at entry was significantly lower in FGPS group compared with controls, improving at 1 and 2 years beyond control scores (p<.001). BES remained unchanged, except for queries regarding generals, which showed improvement.
Conclusions: FGPS appears to result in significant improvement in genital self-image and overall sexual satisfaction, as rated by validated instruments. Additionally, and controversially, women requesting surgery at entry clearly tested positive for BDD, as rated by a standard and heretofore reliable instrument. Although psychological dogma teaches that surgery cannot correct body dysmorphia, this is what apparently occurred in the case of FGPS, either invalidating this instrument for use when evaluating dysmorphia with relation to female genitalia, or disproving the inability of a surgical procedure to alter apparent dysmorphia in relation to genitalia. Additionally, previously existing statistically significant deviations in genital self-image and sexual satisfaction appear to have been adjudicated following surgery.

Differences @ entry significant p<.0001. NS @ 12 & 24 months.

Disclosure:
Work supported by industry: no.

10:40 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Concordance Analysis of Patients Diagnosed Using DSM-IV-TR with Diagnostic Criteria for Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorder from a Phase 2B Study with Bremelanotide (#010)

Anita H. Clayton, MD, IF

010
Concordance Analysis of Patients Diagnosed Using DSM-IV-TR with Diagnostic Criteria for Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorder from a Phase 2B Study with Bremelanotide
Clayton, AH1; Spana, C2; Jordan, R2
1: University of Virginia, USA; 2: Palatin Technologies, Inc., USA

Objective: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition, Text Revision; DSM-IV-TR) categorizes female sexual arousal disorder (FSAD) and hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) as discrete diagnoses. The DSM (Fifth Edition; DSM-5) combines FSAD and HSDD into the single diagnosis of female sexual interest/arousal disorder (FSI/AD). Palatin Technologies recently completed a phase 2B trial to assess bremelanotide (BMT) in patients with a diagnosis of HSDD and/or FSAD based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. Data using the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for FSI/AD were also collected. The objective was to assess the correlation between patients diagnosed with FSI/AD with patients diagnosed with HSDD, FSAD, or mixed HSDD/FSAD using DSM-IV-TR criteria.
Material and Methods: Patients enrolled in the study were diagnosed under the DSM-IV-TR criteria. Key diagnostic criteria were: Female Sexual Function Index score of ≤26, Female Sexual Distress Scale – Desire Arousal Orgasm score >18, exclusion of concomitant medications known to cause sexual dysfunction, a diagnostic interview that confirmed that the female sexual dysfunction was not caused by relationship issues, comorbid conditions or medications and that it was acquired (not lifelong) and generalized (not situational). In addition, the subject must have normal sexual function previously, be in a stable relationship for at least 6 months, and be pre-menopausal. After diagnosis,the clinician completed a checklist with the draft DSM-5 diagnostic criteria (from April 2011).
Results: The initial analysis of the modified intent-to-treat population showed modest correlation between the 2 diagnostic systems, with 68.2% of Study 54 patients (who met the DSM-IV-TR criteria) meeting the FSI/AD diagnosis. Failure to meet the diagnostic criteria occurred in 82 patients due to the absence of distress (Item B; N=19) or abnormalities not explained by an alternative Axis I disorder (Item C; N=63); 4 patients did not fulfill 3 of 6 criteria in Item A. Additional analysis showed that of those patients who were entered into the study per DSM-IV-TR diagnosis, 72% of mixed HSDD/FSAD patients, 61% of HSDD only patients, and 27% of FSAD only patients, also met the draft DSM-5 criteria.
Conclusion: Based on this analysis, the majority of HSDD and mixed HSDD/FSAD patients met both the DSM-IV-TR and draft DSM-5 criteria. Most FSAD only patients did not meet the draft DSM-5 criteria. Palatin Technologies will continue to explore the concordance between the diagnostic criteria as part of its phase 3 program for BMT.

Disclosure:
Work supported by industry: yes, by Palatin Technologies, Inc. (industry initiated, executed and funded study). The presenter or any of the authors act as a consultant, employee (part time or full time) or shareholder of an industry.

10:50 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Sub-urethral Sling Surgery for Stress Incontinence May Result in Orgasmic Dysfunction through Direct Injury to Anterior Vaginal Wall, Peri-Urethral Prostatic Tissue (#011)

N. Szell

011
Sub-urethral Sling Surgery for Stress Incontinence May Result in Orgasmic Dysfunction through Direct Injury to Anterior Vaginal Wall, Peri-Urethral Prostatic Tissue
Szell, N1; Hartzell, R2; Cohen, D3; Goldstein, SW4; Gonzalez, JR5; Goldstein, I5
1: St. John Providence Hospital, USA; 2: San Diego Sexual Medicine, San Diego, USA; 3: Fundamental Physical Therapy and Pelvic Wellness, San Diego, USA; 4: San Diego Sexual Medicine, San DIego, USA; 5: San Diego Sexual Medicine, USA

Objectives: Multiple physiological changes occur in the female genital tract during orgasm including: smooth muscle relaxation and tumescence of labia minora; clitoris glans, shaft and crural corpora cavernosa; vaginal introitus and wall; and peri-urethral, prostatic anterior vaginal wall structures. "Clitoral orgasm" follows clitoral glans and shaft stimulation, with associated rhythmic contractions of the vagina. "Vaginal orgasm" follows anterior vaginal wall/peri-urethral tissue stimulation, with associated rhythmic contraction of the vagina, and in some women, with concomitant female ejaculation/squirting. In women with stress incontinence, surgical placement of a sub-urethral sling is in the IDENTICAL anatomic location as the anterior vaginal wall/peri-urethral tissue. Motivated by two women assessed in our office who were distressed after losing female ejaculation orgasmic capabilities following sub-urethral sling placement, we studied the prevalence of orgasmic dysfunction in women who underwent sub-urethral surgery for stress incontinence and subsequently developed a questionnaire to pre-operatively assess unique orgasm types experienced by this cohort.
Methods: We examined overall sexual function and orgasmic outcomes of 2,352 women who underwent sub-urethral sling surgeries with follow-up of 10.5 months, range 3 - 24 months, from 21 different publications between 2002 – 2012.
Result: Most patients who received a sub-urethral sling for stress urinary incontinence reported either no change or improvement in sexual function post-operatively. However, 14-20% of women experienced worsened sexual function. Approximately 6% of women reported worsening of orgasm frequency and intensity, with significant lowering of post-op versus pre-op orgasm scores. We interviewed healthy women to develop a draft of a questionnaire to be given pre-op to assess orgasmic type, specifically vaginal orgasm with female ejaculation. We are currently testing the questionnaire pre-operatively in women with stress incontinence considering sub-urethral sling surgery, with intent to retest them at specific post-operative periods.
Conclusion: After sub-urethral sling placement, it is hypothesized that women, who were pre-operatively experiencing vaginal orgasm with associated female ejaculation/squirting, are at great risk of developing orgasmic dysfunction secondary to direct sub-urethral sling injury to peri-urethral, prostatic anterior wall tissue Pre-operative identification of women with vaginal orgasm/female ejaculation/squirting may be the key to avoiding post-op orgasmic dysfunction.

Disclosure:
Work supported by industry: no.

11:00 a.m. - 11:10 a.m.
Effects on Female Partners of Treating Peyronie’s Disease with Collagenase Clostridium (#012)

Sue W. Goldstein, BA, CCRC, IF

012
Effects on Female Partners of Treating Peyronie's Disease with Collagenase Clostridium
Goldstein, SW1; Knoll, D2; Lipshultz, LI3; Tursi, JP4; Smith, TM4; Kaufman, GJ4; Gilbert, K4; Rosen, RC5; McMahon, CG6; Goldstein, I1
1: San Diego Sexual Medicine, USA; 2: Center for Urological Treatment, USA; 3: Scott Department of Urology, Baylor College of Medicine, USA; 4: Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, Inc, USA; 5: New England Research Institutes, Inc, USA; 6: Australian Centre for Sexual Health, Australia

Objectives: Female partners of men with Peyronie's disease (PD) offer suffer from painful intercourse due to the curvature of the penis, or are unable to have intercourse at all based on the severity of the disease. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum (CCH) is now an approved intralesional therapy for treatment of men with PD with a palpable plaque and curvature deformity of ³30 degrees at the start of therapy. This study evaluates bother reported by the female sexual partners (FSPs) of the men being treated with CCH in an open label clinical trial.
Materials and methods: FSPs who chose to participate in the study completed the female sexual function index (FSFI) and the Peyronie's Disease Questionnare for FSPs (PDQ-FSP), a 12-item, investigational questionnaire adapted from the men's PDQ. Men with PD received up to 8 injections of CCH 0.58 mg/injection over 24 weeks in this phase 3, open-label study. Assessments included penile curvature deformity measures and the PD questionnaire (PDQ).
Results: A total of 189 men and 30 FSP's were enrolled in the study. From baseline to Week 52, a 36.3% (95% CI 30.9%, 41.6%) improvement in penile curvature deformity and a 2.4 point (95% CI 1.8, 3.0) improvement in PDQ bother score was observed in the male subjects. The most common AEs reported were penile hematoma, penile pain, and penile swelling; no serious treatment-related AEs were reported. Following CCH treatment of their male partners with PD, FSPs reported improvement (using the PDQ-FSP) in both their male partner's PD symptoms and female bother by their partner's PD (mean score reductions of 4.8 and 2.0, respectively). Improvement was also observed on the FSFI scales of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain, as well as the full scale total scores. The proportion of FSPs who reported sexual dysfunction (FSFI total score of <26.55) decreased from 75% at baseline to 33.3% after partner treatment.
Conclusions: Exploratory analyses of FSP responses demonstrated decreases in FSP assessments of their partner's PD symptoms as well as female bother by their partner's PD symptoms after their partner's CCH treatment. Improvement in female sexual function was observed as measured by all 6 domains of the FSFI score, and FSP sexual dysfunction decreased.

Disclosure:
Work supported by industry: yes, by Auxilium Pharmaceuticals (industry initiated, executed and funded study). The presenter or any of the authors act as a consultant, employee (part time or full time) or shareholder of an industry.

11:10 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.
A Randomized, Single Center, Single-Blind, Crossover Thermographic Study Evaluating the Effect of 1000 mcg Topical Alprostadil Cream Compared with an Over-the-Counter Lubricant (#013)

Sue W. Goldstein, BA, CCRC, IF

013
A Randomized, Single Center, Single-Blind, Crossover Thermographic Study Evaluating the Effect of 1000 mcg Topical Alprostadil Cream Compared with an Over-the-Counter Lubricant
Goldstein, SW1; Gonzalez, J1; Gagnon, C1; Minton, JN1; Morris, D2; Goldstein, I1
1: San Diego Sexual Medicine, USA; 2: Webbwrites, USA

Objectives: Genital blood flow may be measured by invasive techniques such as vaginal photoplethysmography and non-invasive such as Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) thermography. In a prospective, randomized, single center, single-blind, crossover thermographic study FLIR was used to determine changes in peripheral arousal using 1000 mcg topical alprostadil cream (Femprox) vs. an over-the-counter (OTC) lubricant. Alprostadil is a vasoactive compound, increasing intracellular cAMP and activation of protein kinase A, resulting in genital smooth muscle relaxation, vulvovaginal vasodilation and enhanced genital secretion.
Material and Methods: In this proof-of-concept study, ten healthy premenopausal women (mean age 32 +/- 12 years) were topically administered study drug to their clitoris and anterior vaginal wall by a designated nurse practitioner who had no other involvement in the study to maintain the blind. Temperatures of the vestibule, clitoris and vulva were continuously monitored by FLIR for 30 minutes before (baseline) and 60 minutes post-application in subjects watching a non-sexual (travel) film. Subjects completed baseline and post-treatment questionnaires assessing genital sensations, maximum intensity and duration of effect; adverse events were recorded.
Results: Topical alprostadil cream induced a statistically significant increase in temperature of the vestibule, clitoris and vulva relative to the OTC lubricant in all subjects. Sustained statistically significant treatment differences occurred at 11 minutes post-application for the vestibule, 19 minutes for the clitoris and 9 minutes for the vulva and maintained for the duration of the assessment. Six of ten women reported being aware/conscious of genital sensations with the topical alprostadil cream and not the OTC lubricant, consistent with concordance of physiological and subjective assessments. Discordence was noted in 30% who reported being aware/conscious of genital sensations with both treatments and 10% who reported not being aware/conscious of genital sensations with either. No adverse events were reported.
Conclusion: Topical alprostadil cream administered to healthy premenopausal women induced statistically significant sustained increases in genital temperatures of the vestibule, clitoris and vulva within 19 minutes relative to OTC lubricant. Further studies are planned.

Disclosure:
Work supported by industry: yes, by Apricus Biosciences (industry funding only - investigator initiated and executed study). The presenter or any of the authors act as a consultant, employee (part time or full time) or shareholder of an industry.

11:20 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
A Pain in the Clitoris: A Systematic Description of Clitorodynia (#014)

M. Parada

014
A Pain in the Clitoris: A Systematic Description of Clitorodynia
Parada, M1; D'Amours, T1; Amsel, R1; Pink, L2; Gordon, A2; Binik, YM1
1: McGill University, Canada; 2: Wasser Pain Management Centre, Canada

A subset of women suffers from clitorodynia, classified as a localized type of vulvodynia. Our knowledge of this debilitating genital pain disorder originates from limited case studies and no empirical data. Further, women with clitorodynia generally resemble those with vulvodynia and are subsequently prescribed the same treatments with low effectiveness.
Objectives: The objective of the present study was to address the critical gap in our knowledge of this condition and to assess if clitorodynia should be characterized as a distinct clinical syndrome.
Material and Methods: 126 women with clitoral pain completed an online questionnaire that assessed demographic information, descriptive pain characteristics, intensity and impact on daily activities and sexual function. Gynecological and medical history was collected to assess common clinical characteristics of clitorodynia sufferers.
Results: A k-means cluster analysis revealed two main clusters that exhibited distinct sets of pain characteristics. An older-aged, high clitoral pain group (H-CP), characterized as experiencing a significantly higher frequency and length of pain episodes, higher subjective ratings of pain intensity and distress, higher scores on the SF-MPQ-2 and higher reported impact on daily activities and sexual function compared to a younger-aged, low clitoral pain (L-CP) group. A significantly greater percentage of women in the H-CP group reported experiencing generalized pain along with clitoral pain, as opposed to localized pain, compared to women in the L-CP group. The progression of pain was also more likely to be reported as consistently generalized for the H-CP group compared to the L-CP group, which reported changes in pain symptoms from localized to generalized pain. Finally, an analysis of the progression of subjective ratings of pain revealed a significant decrease in pain intensity and distress ratings over time for both clusters. However, distress ratings improved more for the L-CP group.
Conclusions: Our findings reveal that two sub-types of clitoral pain sufferers exist with unique pain characteristics and subjective experiences. These data signify a potential need for reconsideration of the current classification of clitorodynia. This is the largest, most comprehensive dataset of clitoral pain sufferers collected.

Disclosure:
Work supported by industry: no.

11:30 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.
Surgical Treatment of Clitoral Phimosis and Labial Adhesions Caused by Lichen Sclerosus (#015)

A.E. Nichols

015
Surgical Treatment of Clitoral Phimosis and Labial Adhesions Caused by Lichen Sclerosus
Nichols, AE1; Rieff, MF2; King, MA2; Krapf, JM3; Goldstein, AT2
1: George Washington University Medical School, USA; 2: The Centers for Vulvovaginal Disorders, USA; 3: George Washington University, USA

Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient experience and outcomes in women undergoing surgical correction for scarring caused by anogenital lichen sclerosus.
Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients at a vulvar disorders clinic was performed to identify women who had undergone surgical correction of clitoral phimosis or lysis of vulvar adhesions for granuloma fissuratum due to anogenital lichen sclerosus. Twenty-seven women were contacted 4 to 130 months post operatively by a research assistant over the telephone. An 8-question survey was used to determine patient experience and outcomes. Question topics included patient satisfaction with the surgery, effects on clitoral sensation, orgasm and pain with intercourse, post-operative symptoms or complications and the presence of recurrent vulvar scarring.
Results: Participants reported that they were either very satisfied (45.8%) or satisfied (37.5%) with the procedure. Of the women who experienced decreased clitoral sensation prior to surgery the majority of women endorsed normal (31.3%) or improved but not normal (37.5%) clitoral sensation after surgery. Of the women who had experienced pain with sexual intercourse prior to surgery the majority of women reported having pain free sex (33%) or improved but not completely pain free sex (58%) after surgery. Only one participant listed a complication following surgery; pain with penetration.
Conclusions: This study shows high patient satisfaction and low complication risk associated with surgical correction of clitoral phimosis and lysis of vulvar adhesions for vulvar granuloma fissuratum caused by anogenital lichen sclerosus. Patients reported improvement in clitoral sensation and ability to achieve orgasm, as well as decreased pain with sexual intercourse. Surgical correction of vulvar scarring is a viable option to restore vulvar anatomy and sexual function in appropriate candidates with anogenital lichen sclerosus.

Disclosure:
Work supported by industry: no.

11:40 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.
Patient Experience with Solubilized Estradiol Given Vaginally in a Novel Softgel Capsule (VagiCap™) (#016)

Sheryl A. Kingsberg, PhD, IF

016
Patient Experience with Solubilized Estradiol Given Vaginally in a Novel Softgel Capsule (VagiCap™)
Kingsberg, S1; Amadio, J2; Graham, S2; Bernick, B2; Mirkin, S2
1: University Hospitals Case Medical Center, USA; 2: TherapeuticsMD

Objective: To evaluate the use and satisfaction of a new self-inserted soft gel vaginal formulation capsule (VagiCap™) containing solubilized 10 µg 17β-estradiol (TX-004HR) utilized in a pilot Vulvar and Vaginal Atrophy (VVA) study.
Methods: An IRB approved 8 question survey, designed to evaluate the subject experience with a self-administered vaginal gelcap, was administered to 49 healthy postmenopausal women participating in a 14-day, randomized pilot VVA study (n=24 received 10 µg solubilized estradiol gelcaps [Test] and n=25 received placebo gelcaps [Placebo]). A total of 679 capsules were self-administered.
Results: Overall, 96% of respondents replied that the capsule was easy to insert. About 25% of women from each group indicated that the capsule completely dissolved; vaginal leakage/discharge was reported by 38% and 28% of women in Test and Placebo, respectively. There were no reports of the capsule coming out after administration. The majority of women (63%) in Test group responded they were either "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with the product versus 36% in Placebo. The majority of women responded that it was "very" to "somewhat easy" to use the medication in the vaginal capsule and to take the capsule as instructed (97% and 94%, respectively). When asked about preference of the vaginal capsule compared to previous medications or therapies taken for their VVA symptoms, 36% "very much" to "somewhat preferred" the vaginal capsule and 66% said that they would "probably" or "definitely" consider using the vaginal capsule again. More women in the Test group (63%) reported that their quality of life was "somewhat" to "much better" at the end of the study compared to 48% in Placebo.
Conclusion: Women who received TX-004HR reported an improved quality of life and satisfaction compared to placebo. TX-004HR may represent a novel option for treating menopause-related VVA that women may find convenient and easy to use.

Disclosure:
Work supported by industry: yes, by TherapeuticsMD (industry initiated, executed and funded study). The presenter or any of the authors act as a consultant, employee (part time or full time) or shareholder of an industry.


10:30 a.m. - 01:00 p.m.
Instructional Course 2 - HPV-related Cancers

Location: Capitol Ballroom E
Faculty: Brooke Faught, MSN, WHNP-BC, IF, Shari Goldfarb, MD & Susan Kellogg-Spadt, PhD, CRNP, IF

Afternoon

12:00 p.m. - 01:00 p.m.
Lunch & Learn 1 - Social Media in Sexual Medicine

Location: Capitol Ballroom A-D
Faculty: Robert S. Miller, MD, FACP

01:00 p.m. - 03:00 p.m.
Symposium 2 - Porn Addiction, Sex Addiction, or just another OCD?

Location: Capitol Ballroom A-D
Moderator: Michael A. Perelman, PhD, IF

01:00 p.m. - 01:30 p.m.
Sexual Minorities and Out of Control Sex

Charles A. Moser, MD, PhD

01:30 p.m. - 02:00 p.m.
The Importance of Controversy in Sexual Medicine

Michael A. Perelman, PhD, IF

02:00 p.m. - 02:30 p.m.
Models Matter: Experimental Studies Falsify Addiction Predictions of Frequent Sexual Behaviors

Nicole Prause, PhD

02:30 p.m. - 03:00 p.m.
After 30 Years of Theory, What do the Data on Sex Addiction Actually Show?

David J. Ley, PhD


03:00 p.m. - 03:30 p.m.
Coffee Break - Visit Exhibitors

Location: Capitol View Terrace

03:30 p.m. - 04:30 p.m.
State of the Art 3 - Regulation of Sexual Arousal and Desire by Epigenetic Pleasure-Related Mechanisms

Location: Capitol Ballroom A-D
Moderator: Sharon J. Parish, MD, IF, NCMP

03:30 p.m. - 04:30 p.m.
Regulation of Sexual Arousal and Desire by Epigenetic Pleasure-Related Mechanisms

James Pfaus, PhD


04:30 p.m. - 05:00 p.m.
NAMS Guest Lecture

Location: Capitol Ballroom A-D
Moderator: Lisa Larkin, MD, FACP, NCMP

04:30 p.m. - 05:00 p.m.
Novel Treatments for Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause (GSM)

JoAnn V. Pinkerton, MD


05:00 p.m. - 06:00 p.m.
ISSWSH Business Meeting

Location: Capitol Ballroom A-D

Thursday, Feb. 19, 2015 Friday, Feb. 20, 2015 Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015 Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015